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Department of Arabic 

Department of Arabic Academic Programs

The Department of Arabic provides students with an in-depth knowledge of Arabic language and literature, to enable them to work in the fields of their specialization with competence, and to pursue advanced studies. The department offers a m ajor program of study leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Arabic Language and Literature. The Department also has minors in Arabic, Translation, and Journalism. The Department also offers Hebrew language courses as electives.

Credits needed for the degree

A student majoring in Arabic needs to earn a total of 125 credits distributed as follows.


Category

Credits

Major

61

Minor

24

University Requirements

34

Electives

6

Total

125

Major in Arabic

The Arabic major consists of a total of 61 credits in the following table:


ARAB 120

Arabic Language Skills I (3)

ARAB 315

Palestinian Literature (3)

ARAB 121

Arabic Language Skills II (3)

ARAB 331

Arabic Criticism (3)

ARAB 142

Prosody (3)

ARAB 332

Modern Criticism (3)

ARAB 211

Jahilite Literature (3)

ARAB 333

Arabic Rhetoric (3)

ARAB 212

Islamic Literature (3)

ARAB 334

Arabic Novel & Drama (3 )

ARAB 251

Intro. to Grammar I (3)

ARAB 351

Studies in Grammar (3)

ARAB 252

Intro. To Grammar II (3)

ARAB 352

Grammatical Practice (3)

ARAB 291

Research Methods in Lang & Lit (3)

ARAB 354

Modern Linguistics (3)

ARAB 311

Abbasid Literature (3)

ARAB 371

Science of Qur’an & Hadith (3)

ARAB 312

Andalusian Literature (3)

ARAB 389

Senior Seminar (1)

ARAB 314

Modern Poetry (3)

 

 

Students majoring in Arabic are provided with the opportunity to minor in a discipline other than their major field. A student may take a minor program consisting of 24 credits in the Faculties of Arts, Sciences, and Business Administration.


Paradigm of courses

Bachelor of Arts in Arabic Language and Literature

First Year

FALL SEMESTER

CR

SPRING SEMESTER

CR

ARAB 120

Arabic Language Skills I

3

ARAB 121

Arabic Language Skills II

3

ENGL 120

English Language Skills I

3

ARAB 142

Prosody

3

HIST 120

History of Modern Palestine

3

ENGL 121

English Language Skills II

3

LIBR 101

Library Skills

R

SCIE 111

General Science

3

MATH 111

Fundamentals of Math

3

 

Fine Arts Requirement

2

PSED 101

Physical Education

1

 

General Elective

3

 

General Elective

3

 

 

 

 

 

16

 

 

17


Second Year


FALL SEMESTER

CR

SPRING SEMESTER

CR

ARAB 211

Jahilite Literature

3

ARAB 212

Islamic Literature

3

ARAB 251

Intro. to Grammar I

3

ARAB 333

Arabic Rhetoric

3

ARAB 291

Research Meth. in Lang & Lit

3

ARAB 252

Intro to Grammar II

3

ENGL 213

English Language Skills III

3

CMSR 101

Community Service

1

 

Minor

3

 

Minor

3

 

 

 

 

Minor

3

 

 

15

 

 

16

 

Third Year

FALL SEMESTER

CR

SPRING SEMESTER

CR

ARAB 311

Abbasid Literature

3

ARAB 312

Andalusian Literature

3

ARAB 331

Arabic Criticism

3

ARAB 332

Modern Criticism

3

ARAB 351

Studies in Grammar

3

ARAB 352

Grammatical Practice

3

POLS 300

Themes in Political Science

3

PHIL 302

Issues in Phil. & Ethics

3

 

Minor

3

 

Minor

3

 

 

15

 

 

15


Fourth Year

FALL SEMESTER

CR

SPRING SEMESTER

CR

ARAB 314

Modern Poetry

3

ARAB 315

Palestinian Literature

3

ARAB 371

Science of Qur’an & Hadith

3

ARAB 334

Arabic Novel & Drama

3

ECON 300

Basic Economics

3

ARAB 354

Modern Linguistics

3

 

Minor

3

ARAB 389

Senior Seminar

1

 

Minor

3

RELS 300

Cultural Religious Studies

3

 

 

 

 

Minor

3

 

 

15

 

 

16


Minors offered by the Department of Arabic

In addition to the m ajor in Arabic, the Department of Arabic provides the opportunity for students to follow a program leading to a minor in Arabic, Translation, or Journalism.


Minor in Arabic

The minor in Arabic requires successful completion of the following courses, totaling 24 credits.

Required Courses (18 Cr.)


ARAB 212

Islamic Literature (3)

 

ARAB 314

Modern Poetry (3)

ARAB 251

Intro. to Grammar I (3)

 

ARAB 315

Palestinian Literature (3)

ARAB 252

Intro. to Grammar II (3)

 

ARAB 332

Modern Criticism (3)


Elective Courses (6 Cr.)


ARAB 311

Abbasid Literature (3)

 

ARAB 334

Arabic Novel & Drama (3)

ARAB 354

Modern Linguistics (3)

 

 

 

Minor in Translation

The minor in Translation requires the successful completion of the following courses, totaling 24 credits.

Required Courses (15 Cr.)


ARAB 252

Intro. To Grammar II (3) *

ARAB 323

Literary Translation (3)

ARAB 321

Principles of Translation (3)

ARAB 325

Technical Translation (3)

ARAB 322

Journalistic Translation (3)

 

 


Elective Courses (9 Cr.)


ARAB 231

Commercial Correspondence (3)

ARAB 327

Legal Translation (3)

ARAB 326

Editing and Revision (3)

ARAB 329

Simultaneous Translation (3)

ARAB 328

Advanced Translation (3)

 

 

* Students majoring in Arabic take ENGL 203 instead of ARAB 252.

Minor in Journalism

The minor in Journalism requires the successful completion of the following courses, totaling 24 credits.

Required Courses (18 Cr.)


JMCO 131

Introduction to Journalism (3)

JMCO 300

Broadcast Journalism (3)

JMCO 132

News Writing (3)

JMCO 332

Editing and Design (3)

JMCO 231

Introduction to Reporting (3)

JMCO 333

Media Skills (3)


Elective Courses (6 Cr.)


JMCO 232

Story & Magazine Articles (3)

 JMCO 331

Palestinian Media (3)

JMCO 320

Photography and Image (3)

 ARAB 322

Journalistic Translation (3)

 JMCO 321

Communication Tech. (3)

 

 

Description of courses

ARAB 105: Arabic Calligraphy (Cr. 1)

Students study the history of Arabic calligraphy and are introduced to all known types. The aim of this course is to enrich the student’s skill in Ruq’a handwriting.

ARAB 120: Arabic Language Skills I (Cr. 3)

This course involves the analytical and critical study of literary and linguistic texts. It enriches the student’s skill in reading, conversation, comprehension, and expression.

ARAB 121: Arabic Language Skills II (Cr. 3)

This course reviews the basics of good writing, with emphasis on the sentence, the paragraph, the subject, the title, and punctuation. The art of the essay in Arabic literature with other forms of modern writings are studied. Students are trained in the principles of writing in the different genres of literary writings.

ARAB 142: Prosody (Cr. 3)

This course comprises a study of the science of prosody and its origin: the forms of Arabic poetry, rhyme, and meters. A study is made of prosody meters as formulated by Al-Khalil-Ibn Ahmad. The course involves a study of the music of modern Arabic poetry and the innovations introduced into it.

ARAB 211: Jahilite Literature (Cr. 3)

This course involves the study of outstanding aspects of the Jahilite period, such as diction, social structure of the Jahilite society, prose writing, poetry, and its sources. The course comprises an appreciative, critical and analytical study of Jahilite poetry. The students study the poetry of ‘Imru’ al- Qays, Zuhayr and al-Shanfara.

ARAB 212: Islamic Literature (Cr. 3)

This course comprises the study of the following subjects: basic principles of Islam, al-Qur’an, al-Hadith, and Islamic poetry. Students study the poetry of Hassan bin Thabit, Ka’b bin Zuhyr and Islamic prose (the Prophet’s speech). In addition, the most prominent trends in the Umayyad period are studied: an-Naqa’id, al-Kawarij, the speech of Ziyad, and the treatise of Abdulhamid al-Khatib.

ARAB 231: Commercial Correspondence (Cr. 3)

This course focuses on written and oral communication skills. Students are trained in writing various commercial letters and correspondence; inter office memos; and curriculum vitae. They are also exposed to translation drills of minutes, agenda, and the like.

ARAB 251: Introduction to Grammar I (Cr. 3)

Students study in this course Arabic grammar under etymology, inflection and derivation, parts of speech, word formation, temporal structure of the verb, gender in nouns, division of the noun according to number, diminution and attribution, the relative adjective, pronouns, modes of the verb, and conjugation.

ARAB 252: Introduction to Grammar II (Cr. 3)

In this course, students study Arabic grammar under diptotes, declension of nouns, nominal sentences, verbal sentences, the subject and the predicate, the weak verb, complements to the verbal sentence, requests, conditional sentences, the vocative, “exclamations” and oaths, the forms expressive of surprise or wonder, and practical applications of grammatical analysis.

ARAB 253: Introduction to Grammar III (Cr. 3)

In this course, students study a general view of the verb and its forms, the voices, tenses of the verb, moods, numerals, particles, adverbs, complements, conditional, and particles of meaning.

ARAB 291: Research Methods in Language and Literature (Cr. 3)

Students study methods of research, the term paper, the report, sources of information, documentation, footnotes, ethics of research, research outline and the organization of the study, the subject and its importance, the aims of the study, definition of terms, abbreviations, references, bibliography, general writing form, the library, and methods of classification.

ARAB 310: Syntactic Skills (Cr. 3)

This course is offered to students of other d epartments. It comprises the study of language, its structure, and methods of study. Students also study the science of linguistics ; the characteristics of Arabic sounds ; and Arabic grammar as parts of speech, structural patterns, and construction of utterances.

ARAB 311: Abbasid Literature (Cr. 3)

This course involves the study of the development of the intellectual, economic and social fields in the Abbasid period through the study of poetry, focused on prominent poets such as Abu-Tammam, al-Buhturi, and Al-Mutanabiy. Varieties of prose, their development, and prominent prose writers such as Ibn-ul-Muqaffa’, Al-Jahiz, and Badi’ az-Zaman are also studied.

ARAB 312: Andalusian Literature (Cr. 3)

This course studies general features of cultural and literary life in various periods of Al-Andalus history to help students become acquainted with some aspects of Andalusian literature. The course focuses on the following Andalusian poets: ‘Asim bin Zayd, Hasanah Tamymyah, Yahya al-Ghazal, Ahmed Abdrabu, Ibn Hani, al Qastali, Ibn Shuhayd, Ibn Zaydun, and Ibn al-Khatib. Students also study arts in which the Andalusians excelled, such as al-Muwashshahat, az-Zajal, as well as the influence of Andalusian environment on poetry.

ARAB 313: Literature of Egypt and Syria (Cr. 3)

The focus of this course is the study of political, military, economic and scientific developments and intellectual trends during the Zenki, Ayyoubi and Mamluki periods. The following poets are studied: Ibn-ul-Qaisaraniyy, Usama-Ibn-Munqidh, Ibn-as-Sa’atiyy, and al Busiyri. The course also includes works of various prose writers in this period as: al-Qadi al-Fadil, Ibn al-Sayrafi, Izzidine Bin as-Salam, as well as the influence of this period on Arabic literature.

ARAB 314: Modern Poetry (Cr. 3)

This course comprises the study of the renaissance of Arabic poetry in the 19th century, through specimens and development of various schools in modern Arabic poetry as ad-Diwan, Apollo, and al-Mahjar. The course includes a study of free verse poetry and its development. Extracts from poems of the most prominent poets are analyzed.

ARAB 315: Palestinian Literature (Cr. 3)

In this course, students study characteristics of the literary renaissance in Palestine, traditional and modern trends in poetry, and the national trend in Palestinian poetry. Texts by Abulkarim al-Karmi, Ibrahim Tuqan, and Mahmud Darwish are also examined. The short story, the novel, prominent novelists, and various trends in Palestinian prose literature are also studied.

ARAB 316: Comparative Literature (Cr. 3)

This course comprises the study of the origin and research methods of comparative literature in the West and in the Arab World. Western influences on Arabic literature as the novel, drama, poetry, literary criticism, and literary schools are also studied. Additional studies include the delineation of national literatures and the French influence on Taha Husain .

ARAB 317: Popular Literature (Cr. 3)

This course familiarizes students with various genres of popular literature in Palestine and the Arab World. Special emphasis is placed on the myth, tale, and lyrical poetry. Students study methods of research and analysis of popular Arabic and Western literature, and the tools used in gathering, classifying, and analyzing collected material.

ARAB 321: Principles of Translation (Cr. 3)

This course introduces the students to the general principles of translation both from English to Arabic and from Arabic to English. Emphasis is placed on the different stages of the translation process, the difference between translation and transliteration, the use of dictionaries, translation procedures, and the translation of idioms. The students proceed from simple concepts and structures to more advanced complex work.

ARAB 322: Journalistic Translation (Cr. 3)

This course is an introduction to the translation of journalistic passages from English to Arabic and from Arabic to English, covering a wide range of subjects and styles. Emphasis is placed on translating articles from various branches of knowledge representing a variety of styles in order to acquaint students with requisite vocabulary and terminology. Attention is paid to the use of special dictionaries, translation of scientific terms, and translation in the United Nations.

Prerequisite: ARAB 321

ARAB 323: Literary Translation (Cr. 3)

This course comprises translation of selected texts of modern and classical literature, including extracts from the works of major English writers, as well as passages from Arabic literature and Arabic poetry. Attention is given to the theory of translation, the role of translation, and the translation of styles and literary expression.

Prerequisite: ARAB 322

ARAB 324: Oriental Languages (Cr. 3)

The course comprises the study of an Oriental language such as Hebrew or Syriac in order to facilitate the comparison of Arabic with other languages.

ARAB 325: Technical Translation (Cr. 3)

This course comprises the principles and practice of translating cultural, legal, and economic texts. It identifies problems faced by the translator and methods of solving them. Students practice translating business letters, forms, newsletters, brochures, advertisements, and certificates.

Prerequisite: ARAB 321

ARAB 326: Editing and Revision (Cr. 3)

This course is designed to help students avoid common mistakes in Arabic and English. It trains students to revise, edit, and lay out translated texts, including titles, introductions, footnotes, and appendixes.

Prerequisite: ARAB 321

ARAB 327: Legal Translation (Cr. 3)

This course aims at training students in translating legal texts, and highlights major problems faced by translators and methods of solving them. Students are trained in translating texts related to government and court documents. This highly specialized course is of crucial importance at present due to high demand on this kind of translation.

ARAB 328: Advanced Translation (Cr. 3)

This course builds upon translation skills acquired in earlier courses. Emphasis is placed on structural systems and lexical coverage inherent in both languages, focusing on more difficult English and Arabic classical texts. Attention is given to the translation of poetry, religious texts, and culture.

Prerequisite: ARAB 322

ARAB 329: Simultaneous Translation (Cr. 3)

This course trains students in the techniques of both simultaneous and consecutive translation. It is based on practical work in order to familiarize students with the equipment used. Students are expected to interpret speeches and lectures on a variety of subjects.

Prerequisite: ARAB 322

ARAB 331: Arabic Criticism (Cr. 3)

This course comprises the study of classical Arabic criticism under the concept of literary criticism; Arabic criticism during the Jahilite, Islamic, Umayyad and Abbasid periods; the works of Ibn al-Mu’taz, Ibn Sallam, Qudamah, al-Amidiyy and al-Qadi-al-Jurjani ; and literary criticism in the sixth and seventh centuries A.H.

ARAB 332: Modern Criticism (Cr. 3)

Students study in this course modern criticism under th e nature of the criticism process, elements of literary work, origins of literary criticism, Greek criticism, and methods and schools of literary criticism. The course also involves a study of the 10 main characteristics of narrative and dramatic Arabic literature.

ARAB 333: Arabic Rhetoric (Cr. 3)

Students study the science of rhetoric, its origin and collection, technicalities, and its various schools.

ARAB 334: Arabic Novel and Drama (Cr. 3)

This course familiariz es students with dramatic and narrative art in modern Arabic literature by studying its historical development. Special emphasis is placed on the study of the origins of the narrative, and dramatic art in Egypt, Syria, and Iraq. Modern narrative and dramatic texts by Tawfiq al-Hakim and Najib Mahfuz are critically studied.

ARAB 351: Studies in Grammar (Cr. 3)

This course comprises a study of selected topics from traditional Arabic grammar compilations, to enable students to understand them and become familiar with the style of old prominent grammarians. The students review selected texts from Sibawayh, Ibn-Mada’, Ibn-ul-Anbariy, al-Farra’, Az Zamakhshariy, Ibn-Jinniy, Ibn Hisham, and Abu Hayyan. The course also comprises an introduction to modernization efforts in grammar.

Prerequisite: ARAB 251, 252

ARAB 352: Grammatical Practice (Cr. 3)

In this course, students practice grammatical structures, such as the nominal sentence, subject and predicate, case forms, the verbal sentence, the verb and its modifications, subject, complements, participles, and numbers. Students study texts to help them understand the syntax of the sentence.

Prerequisite: ARAB 251, 252

ARAB 353: Schools of Grammar (Cr. 3)

This course comprises the study of the grammar schools of Basra, Kufa, Baghdad, Egypt, and al-Andalus, and their role in developing Arabic grammar. Detailed attention is paid to modern critical studies of Arabic grammar and efforts for its re-classification and simplification.

Prerequisite: ARAB 251, 252

ARAB 354: Modern Linguistics (Cr. 3)

Emphasis in this course is placed on the development of linguistics and its research methods under language, phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics, Arabic sounds, intonation, the Arabic word, the syllable, stems, as well as transformational and generative grammar.

Prerequisite: ARAB 251, 252

ARAB 371: Sciences of the Qur’an and Hadith (Cr. 3)

This course comprises a study of the Qur’anic sciences, Meccan and Medinite exegesis and their impact on Arabic literature, the kinds of al-Hadith, its sources and methods of transference and quotation in language and literature, and the influence of al-Hadith on literature and grammar.

ARAB 372: Islamic Philosophy (Cr. 3)

This course focuses on the most prominent philosophies introduced into Arab Muslim society. Emphasis is placed on the conflict of their ideologies with Arab Muslim civilization. The course also concentrates on the study of the most prominent Muslim philosophers, with emphasis on selected extracts from the works of al-Kindiy, Avicenne, al-Farabiy, Averroes, and al-Ghazali .

Prerequisite: ARAB 212

ARAB 389: Senior Seminar (Cr. 1)

This course gives senior students the chance to do original research on a topic in Arabic language and literature under the supervision of an instructor from the D epartment. Students orally present their research to their colleagues and teachers followed by a discussion of the main results.

ARAB 399: Topics in language and Literature (Cr. 3)

This course gives senior students the opportunity to do individual research on a topic in Arabic language and literature under the supervision of an instructor with weekly meetings. Students registered in this course must sign an agreement with the chairperson of the Department and obtain approval from the Academic Vice President.

Journalism

JMCO 131: Introduction to Journalism (Cr. 3)

This course is an introductory survey of the theory, history, structure, and functions of journalism. The course focuses on print journalism with special emphasis on the history of the Arab Press. Students study the structure of the newspaper, sources of information, types of newspapers, and public opinion. The rights and responsibilities of journalists and ethics of journalism are discussed.

JMCO 132: News Writing (Cr. 3)

A study and practice of basic writing and editing techniques used in the print media are discussed. The course offers the students various methods of writing newspaper articles and writing for magazines. Assignments focus primarily on gathering and writing news.

JMCO 231: Introduction to Reporting (Cr. 3)

This course examines the basic news reporting principles, strategies, and tactics needed by today’s journalists. Practice in gathering, organizing, and presenting news is a major concern. Emphasis is on print journalism.

JMCO 232: Story and Magazine Articles (Cr. 3)

This course is an intensive practice in researching, organizing, writing, and analyzing feature articles for magazines and newspaper magazine supplements, and free lancing for print media.

JMCO 300: Broadcast Journalism (Cr. 3)

This course comprises the study of the principles and practice of radio news reporting, writing and editing, sources of information, and forms and types of work in radio. The course also comprises the principles of radio production, organizing radio programs, debates, and interviews.

Prerequisite: JMCO 131, 132

JMCO 320: Photography and Image (Cr. 3)

Students study the principles and practice of photography as a creative tool of communication, basic camera techniques using both conventional methods, and emerging digital technology. The course also provides experience in shooting, developing, printing, and editing.

Prerequisite: JMCO 131, 132

JMCO 321: Communication Technologies (Cr. 3)

This course includes theory, technologies, and communication related to mass media production. Basic computer skills are included, such as scanning, e-mail attachment, CD- RW, PDF, Window Media Player, Word, Power Point, and MS explorer.

JMCO 331: Palestinian Media: History, Law and Contemporary Issues (Cr. 3)

This course offers a review of the development of the Palestinian press during the Ottoman, British Mandate, Jordanian, and Israeli periods; its relationship with political, economic, and social institutions ; the legal aspects of mass communication in Palestine ; and the most important media institutions and organizations in Palestine.

JMCO 332: Editing and Design (Cr. 3)

Th is course focuses on laboratory practice in design and layout, and intensive training to master basic skills. Other areas of study include principles and practice of news media editing, copyediting, headline writing, and page layout.

JMCO 333: Media Skills (Cr. 3)

This course trains students in public relations skills, advertising, and propaganda, as well as preparing polls. The course also emphasizes the morals of the press.

Hebrew Language

HEBR 101: Conversational Hebrew I (Cr. 3)

This is an introductory course with practice in the basic language skills needed for everyday communication. Emphasis is placed on the skills of listening, speaking, and reading.

HEBR 102: Conversational Hebrew II (Cr. 3)

This is a continuation of practice in basic language skills with appropriately increasing difficulty. This course involves a contrastive study of Arabic and Hebrew phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures.

HEBR 103: Intermediate Hebrew (Cr. 3)

Th is course reinforces former learning (grammar, basic structures, and vocabulary), and improves reading and writing skills. Emphasis is placed on oral communication in Hebrew and reading advanced materials. Selections from Hebrew literary texts and newspapers will be used.

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